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Marmorated Stink Bugs Making a Stink in Oregon

Brown marmorated stink bug nymph

Oregon pest management companies have found themselves busy with calls from orchardists and vintners during this fall season because of the alarmingly high number of brown marmorated stink bugs that have moved into Ashland and nearby areas since 2004. Because they love to eat fruit, the non-native insects have the potential to do some serious damage to crops and cause homes to smell foul.

When it comes to pest control, Oregon State University researchers are hard at work finding a solution. They share that the large population of marmorated stink bugs have started to affect organic farmers and gardeners. The fear that vintners have is that bugs will cling to grapes during a harvest and alter the taste of the wine if they get crushed. Right now, the best solution comes in the form of a machine that shakes the bugs out of trees and off vines. Some crop owners even hope that wasps lay eggs inside the stink bug eggs.

Like the native box elder bugs, which feed on maple leaves, marmorated stink bugs like to winter inside houses. The only difference is that if a marmorated stink bug makes it inside your home, your nose will be the first to detect its presence.

Identifying the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Aside from the odor released, one of the best ways to tell a stink bug from a box elder bug is by looking at the color of the antennas. Box elder bugs have brownish antennas with yellowish bands. Stink bugs have coal-colored antennas with white bands.

If you think that you’ve found a brown marmorated stink bug, compare it to photos on the OSU website. After confirming the identification of the invasive species, report it to OSU researchers.

If you notice a group of stink bugs on your property, contact an Oregon pest management company like Eden Pest. Quick action will help keep the bugs out of your home and away from your property.

 

[ Photo by: photochem_PA, on Flickr, via CC License ]

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